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Honey Heaven Honey FAQS

Hungarian Raw Honeys are well known all over the world for their outstanding quality. All our organic raw honeys come from the Hungarian countryside an area of pristine natural beauty where you will find an impressive landscape, unique net of rivers and channels, fresh and nice nature free of pollution, dotted by wild Acacia forest and flowery meadow of fragrant Lavender flowers, provides the perfect setting for collecting the finest single-flower honey. The raw organic honey is ethically extracted using the old traditional methods in a sustainable manner and in total harmony with nature. The result is unpasteurised, unprocessed and unhomogenised organic raw honey, teeming with mother nature's natural goodness. We also offer gourmet creamed organic raw honeys with the finest natural herbs and spices found in nature to produce an exclusive outstanding premium top quality healthy product! All our raw honeys are Organic, GMO & Gluten free! Our main goal is supporting small scale beekeepers this helps us to provide you with outstanding premium quality honeys as mother nature intended. 

We hold in high esteem honey collected in UK but UK population consumes more honeys than it produces. So, we fulfil the high demand by providing varieties of floral honeys not found in the UK. However, has UK is a highly developed country to meet consumers high demand pesticides are used in its agriculture. Also due to the UK high pollution rate the honeys bees are affected. Hungarian raw honeys are well known all over the world for their outstanding quality. All our organic raw honeys come from the Hungarian countryside an area of pristine natural beauty where you will find an impressive landscape, unique net of rivers and channels, fresh and nice nature free of pollution, dotted by wild Acacia forest and flowery meadow of fragrant Lavender flowers, provides the perfect setting for collecting the finest single-flower honey. The raw organic honey is extracted using the old traditional methods in a sustainable manner and in total harmony with nature. The result is unpasteurised, unprocessed and homogenized organic raw honey, teeming with natural goodness. We also offer gourmet creamed organic raw honeys with the finest natural herbs and spices found in nature to produce an outstanding exclusive premium top quality healthy product! All our raw honeys are Organic, GMO & Gluten free! Our goal in supporting small scale beekeepers this helps us to provide you with premium outstanding quality raw honeys as mother nature intended. 

Honey is made by honeybees from the nectar of flowers and plants, not pollen. Pollen is actually an accidental guest in honey, brought back by bees as a source of food for baby bees (the “brood”), or incidentally introduced into the honey through other means, such as during the extraction process. Pollen in honey is sometimes analysed to help determine the primary floral source. The amount of pollen in honey is minuscule and not enough to impact the nutrient value of honey. Honey is still honey, even without pollen.

As bees travel from blossom to blossom in search of nectar, they brush against the pollen-bearing parts of a flower (anther or stamen) and pick up pollen. When the honeybee goes to another flower for more food, some of the pollen from the first flower sticks to the second flower. In this way, the flowers are pollinated. Almonds, apples, avocados, blueberries, cantaloupes, cherries, cranberries, cucumbers, sunflowers, watermelon and many other crops all benefit from honeybees for pollination 

The production of honey is a multi-step process. Let’s follow the honey bees step-by-step as they make this precious food for the colony. Honey is the sweet fluid produced by honeybees from the nectar of flowers. Worker honeybees transform the floral nectar that they gather into honey by adding enzymes to the nectar and reducing the moisture. 

 When the worker bee has found a good source of nectar, she gets to work! Using her proboscis, she sucks up nectar from the inside of flowers, often visiting more than 100 flowers on one foraging trip. The nectar, along with a little bit of honey bee saliva, is stored in a special sac called a honey stomach. Once the honey stomach is full, the worker bee will return to the hive to drop off the load.

 Back at the hive, bees known as house bees wait for the foragers to return. The worker bees pass the nectar to the waiting bees so they can really start the honey-making process. As the nectar is chewed and passed from bee to bee, enzymes change its Ph and other chemical properties. At this stage, the nectar and enzyme mixture contain too much water to be stored over the winter. The bees must work on drying it out.

 Some water is removed from the honey while it is passed from bee to bee. But bees use two other methods for drying out the honey. For one, they will spread the honey over the honeycomb. This process increases the surface area and allows for more water evaporation. Bees will also fan their wings near the honey to increase airflow and evaporate even more liquid. Eventually, the honey will have a water content of about 17-20%, down from a whopping 70%. The bees really do work for their food!

 The final step in the honey-making process is storage. The honey is deposited into the cells of the honeycomb, where it will stay until the bees are ready to eat it. To keep the honey fresh, each cell is capped with beeswax. Making beeswax is another fascinating process. Learn more about beeswax and how bees make it: What is Beeswax? Many of us take honey for granted. We can simply go to the store and pick up some delicious honey to enjoy. We rarely think about all of the time that went into the production of honey. Next time you add a few drops of honey to your breakfast toast or tea, give a little thanks to the hundreds of busy honey bees that made it all possible! Did you know that everything that a honey bee makes is useful in some way? Of course, we are all familiar with the benefits and uses of honey. But honeybees don’t stop there! They make a few other vital resources that can be used by humans: bee pollen, royal jelly and beeswax. Beeswax may not get as much attention as honey, but it plays a significant role in the success of the colony. If you haven’t guessed by now, honeybees live a very orderly existence. They each have their jobs within the colony, including nurses, foragers, cleaners and even the queen herself. So, it makes sense that their homes are just as planned out and functional as the bees themselves. Their hives are made up of tiny, hexagon-shaped cells that are perfectly designed to provide the maximum amount of storage space using the least amount of beeswax. What is beeswax, how it’s made and how we can use it in our homes, skincare products and for our health.

 Beeswax is the building block of the hive. Honeybees from the genus Apis produce it to build the hexagon-shaped honeycomb where bees live, work, raise their young and store their food supplies. In its natural form, beeswax is actually white or translucent. It becomes the light golden colour we associate with beeswax when stained by pollen or propolis. Beeswax is made up of about 300 different compounds. Its composition can vary slightly depending on where the honeybees live.   Worker bees are responsible for producing beeswax. They have special glands on the underside of their abdomens that secrete the wax in thin sheets called scales. Let’s follow one of the worker bees through the process of producing beeswax!

 The first step begins with a worker bee leaving the hive to forage for pollen and nectar. These bees pass on nectar and honey to other bees who will consume it and turn it into wax. Honeybees need vast amounts of nectar to produce wax. In fact, a bee will eat six to eight pounds of honey to make just one pound of beeswax! Once the sugar has been converted into wax, the bees will begin to secrete it through their special glands. The wax starts out as small flakes but is shaped and moulded by the other bees in a fascinating way. The bees will form a chain and pass the secreted wax down the line. Each bee will take their turn chewing the wax to make it soft and pliable. Once the wax reaches the ideal condition, the bees can begin to construct the hexagon-shaped honeycombs. The combs are then filled with honey and capped off with more wax to prevent moisture loss.

Most beekeepers get their beeswax from the wax caps that cover each honey cell. Using a hot knife, a beekeeper will remove the caps, collect them and then melt them to separate the wax from any residual honey. Since the wax is lighter than the honey, it will rise to the top. The beekeeper will remove the top layer of wax and allow it to cool and become a solid mass of beeswax. 

 Like everything that bees make, beeswax has certain properties that make it very useful around the house. And, because it is a natural substance, many people choose home, beauty and wellness products that contain beeswax over those filled with unknown and potentially harmful chemicals. Beeswax is loved by people all around the world because of its nourishing and healing properties.

Seals in moisture so it is a fantastic remedy for dry skin . Contains antioxidants that produce shiny, glowy skin . Acts as a sealant to protect skin from harmful environmental toxins . Protects skin while still allowing it to breathe . Is anti-inflammatory so it can help heal cuts and bruises . Contains vitamin A which promotes cell regeneration . 12 Ways You Can Use Beeswax Around the House . The benefits of beeswax make it a common ingredient in many natural household products. And it just smells good! There is so much that we can do with beeswax. 

 

Lotion bars . Lip balm . Body balm . Beeswax candles . Soaps . Salve for cracked hands and feet . Natural healing for cuts and burns . Acne or eczema treatment . Polishing dull furniture . Are you convinced of the amazing nature of beeswax? There is so much more we could share about beeswax, but we hope that this brief overview gives you a little more knowledge about the fascinating lives of honeybees. 

Honey comes in many colours and flavours. These are called honey varietals and they are determined by the types of flowers the bees visited for nectar. Some are light and sweet; others are dark and bold. Pick the honey you like and enjoy! 

Crystallization is the natural process by which the glucose in honey precipitates out of the liquid honey. Different varieties of honey will crystallize at different rates, and a few not at all. If your honey crystallizes, simply place the honey jar in warm water and stir until the crystals dissolve; or place the honey container, with the cap open, into near boiling water that has been removed from the heat. Also keep in mind that you can eat the honey in a crystallized form. Just scoop out of the jar and spread it on your toast or drop it in your tea, coffee, smoothies etc 

Honey may contain Clostridium botulinum spores that can cause infant botulism, a rare but serious disease that affects the nervous system of young babies (under one year old). C.botulinum spores are present throughout the environment and may be found in dust, soil and improperly canned foods. Adults and children over one year of age are routinely exposed to, but not normally affected by, C. botulinum spores. Honey is safe to consume during pregnancy and lactation. While infants are susceptible to the infant botulism, adults, including pregnant females, are not. The concern for babies stems from the fact that infants lack the fully developed gastrointestinal tract of older humans. Since the mother is not in danger of developing this condition, the unborn baby is protected. 

 Despite our honey being unpasteurized we would still suggest it’s safe to eat during pregnancy. Although we do not advise that children under the age of 12 months old should consume any of our honeys, this is because an infant’s digestive tract isn’t quite ready to process some of the naturally-occurring constituents in honey and this inability could potentially cause problems. Should you have any concerns surrounding this we would advise you contact your GP or Midwife.

Yes. 

All our honey is classified unpasteurised, unheated and unprocessed.  

All our honeys are ethically harvested no processing or pasteurization occurred during the process. 

No, as long as it is unpasteurized. Stored honey can remain stable for decades and even centuries!  Have you heard about the honey they found in Tombs in Egypt? However, honey is susceptible to physical and composition changes during storage; it tends to darken, lose its aroma and flavour, or crystallize over time. 

 

Honey stored in sealed containers can remain stable for decades and even centuries! However, honey is susceptible to physical and chemical changes during storage; it tends to darken and lose its aroma and flavour or crystallize. These are temperature-dependent processes, making the shelf life of honey difficult to define. For practical purposes, a shelf life of two years is often stated. Properly processed, packaged and stored honey retains its quality for a long time. If in doubt, throw it out, and purchase a new jar of honey! 

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